Farm Meet

Queens County Farm House

The Queens County Farm Museum occupies New York City’s largest remaining tract of natural, undisturbed farmland. On a 47-acre parcel, this remarkable piece of land is the last vestige of Queens County’s 300-year history of agriculture as a way of life and livelihood.

The site’s history dates back as far as 1697. The centerpiece of the restored farm is the colonial farmhouse, which was built in 1772. Originally a modest I ½ story, three bay shingled, three room farmhouse, it was later expanded to more than twice its original size by the Cox family in 1856.

The farmhouse, along with the seven acres of land encompassing the entire orchard, farmyard and all outbuildings was designated a landmark by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission in 1976. Then in 1979, the U.S. Department of the Interior listed the same buildings and land in the National Register of Historic Places.

The G.N.Y.R for many years had been looking to hold a swap meet in conjunction with a car show. This was not possible at the Spring Meet because neither Eisenhower Park nor Old Westbury Gardens would allow such a function. No other sites in the metro area met the needs of the club.

In 1979, the Queens County Farm Museum was looking to hold a function, which would give them a monetary shot in the arm for land and building restoration. The property was large and mostly uncleared and the building in dire need of repair.

The two organizations got together and worked out the details to benefit both groups. G.N.Y.R volunteers cleared some land, staked out a swap and show area and the Farmhouse group provided food and port-a-johns and hayrides and the much needed publicity. Volunteers manned the gates and the vendors, the cars and the public came and the rest is now history. The show gets better and better each year. This event is a great family show, as there is something for every member of the family to enjoy.

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